Detailed Schedule

Increased Use of EEG in the Clinic

 

 

The University Club, University of Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA

 

September 5 - 9, 2018

 

 

 

All events will occur in the University Club, 123 University Place, Pittsburgh, PA 15260.

 

The Preconference EEGLab Workshop will occur Tuesday and Wednesday in the University Club 3rd Floor Conference Room A.

 

The conference will begin with an Opening Lecture and Reception Wednesday evening in the University Club, 2nd Floor Ballroom B.

 

 

The Conference sessions on Thursday and Friday will occur in the University Club, 2nd Floor meeting rooms (Ballroom B, Ivy Room, Gold Room) and 3rd Floor Conference Room A.

 

 

On Saturday, Conference sessions will occur in the University Club, 1st Floor Ballroom A and 3rd Floor Conference Room A.

 

 

Saturday’s Conference Banquet will be held at The Porch, Schenley Plaza, 221 Schenley Drive, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, within walking distance of the University Club.

 

 

Sunday’s EEG in Psychiatry tutorial will be held in the University Club 3rd Floor Conference Room A.


Wifi is available. The PW code is PittConferenceGuest

 

 

 

Tuesday September 4th

 

8:00 am - 8:30 am        Continental breakfast & coffee provided

 

8:30 am - 12:30 pm        Pre-Conference EEGLab Workshop Morning Session

                Conference Room A, 3rd floor

         https://sccn.ucsd.edu/~scott/icons/ScottAfterPCT15small.jpg  C:\\ecns\\2018 meeting\\delorme.png

                Course Directors: Scott Makeig & Arnaud Delorme

 

                Pre-registration is required

 

                For the complete syllabus and materials please visit

                https://sccn.ucsd.edu/wiki/EEGLAB_2018_Pittsburgh

 

[10:15 am - 10:30 am    Coffee Break]

 

12:30 pm - 2 pm        Workshop Lunch Break on your own

 

2 pm - 5:30 pm        Pre-Conference EEGLab Workshop Afternoon Session

 

                For a complete syllabus and materials please visit

                https://sccn.ucsd.edu/wiki/EEGLAB_2018_Pittsburgh

 

[3:15 pm - 3:30 pm        Coffee Break]



 

Wednesday September 5th

 

8:00 am - 8:30 am        Continental breakfast & coffee provided

 

8:30 am - 12:30 pm        Pre-Conference EEGLab Workshop Morning Session

                Conference room A, 3rd floor

                Course Directors: Scott Makeig & Arnaud Delorme

               

                Pre-registration is required

 

                For a complete syllabus and materials please visit

                https://sccn.ucsd.edu/wiki/EEGLAB_2018_Pittsburgh

 

[10:15 am - 10:30 am    Coffee Break]

 

12:30 pm - 2 pm        Workshop Lunch Break on your own

 

12:30 pm - 5 pm        ECNS Board Meeting

                Ivy Room, 2nd Floor

                Lunch Provided

 

2:00 pm - 5:30 pm        Pre-Conference EEGLab Workshop Afternoon Session

 

                For a complete syllabus and materials please visit

                https://sccn.ucsd.edu/wiki/EEGLAB_2018_Pittsburgh


[3:15 pm - 3:30 pm        Coffee Break]

 

7:00 pm - 8:00 pm        Opening Lecture

        Ballroom B, 2nd Floorhttps://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/Profile/images/9bf29534-9521-4e0d-871f-8bf533925dc0_w0

 

        Lawrence J Hirsch, Yale University

 

The expanding use of continuous video-EEG monitoring in the critically ill

 

Continuous video-EEG monitoring is being used more and more widely for patients with impaired mental status, primarily for detection of nonconvulsive seizures, but also for ischemia detection and prognostication.  The majority of seizures in critically ill patients are nonconvulsive and can only be diagnosed with EEG. The main risk factors are coma and prior seizures (recent or remote), but also sepsis and any acute supratentorial brain injury with impaired alertness. Nonconvulsive seizures, especially with a high seizure burden, are associated with adverse physiological effects and independently associated with worse short and long-term outcomes, including based on imaging, long term functional scales, cognition, and later epilepsy.  There are many interesting rhythmic and periodic EEG patterns that are seen in these patients. There are now published criteria/guidelines/etc for naming these patterns (including separately for neonates), for performing continuous EEG in all age groups, and for determining whether a pattern represents nonconvulsive seizures or not. Quantitative EEG methods are very helpful for reviewing these studies. When specific patterns are causing neuronal injury and how aggressively to treat are active areas of research and lively debate.

 

8 pm - 10 pm            Opening Reception

                Ballroom B, 2nd Floor


 

Thursday September 6th

 

8:00 am - 8:30 am        Continental breakfast & coffee provided

 

8:30 am - 9:25 pm        Plenary Lecture

    Ballroom B, 2nd FloorC:\\ecns\\2018 meeting\\Foto_Oliver_Pogarell_web.jpg

    Oliver Pogarell, Ludwig Maximilian’s University Munich
 

Reasonable and efficient use of EEG in Psychiatry

 

Electroencephalography (EEG) is a traditional neuropsychiatric tool with relevance in both clinical and basic research. It is a functional tool covering brain electric activity offering a temporal resolution within the range of milliseconds. It allows the investigation of brain states at rest, during cognitive processing, emotional challenges or in different states of vigilance. Sophisticated techniques of analysis enable the investigation of functional connectivity, phase synchronization and phase shifts, further contributing to the knowledge of brain function and regulation. Standard EEG, though underutilized, is the method of choice for assessing organic factors influencing psychiatric presentations und should not be ignored in clinical practice. Quantitative techniques in combination with brain activation (cognitive stimuli) can be used to probe specific brain regions and are useful approaches to non-invasively study brain dysfunction, but also to monitor these changes, to indirectly assess neurochemical functions or even to predict subjects’ prognoses or responses to treatment. The reasonable and efficient use of EEG will be emphasized with a focus on its clinical applications.

 

9:30 - 10:25            ECNS Invited Plenary Lecture

        Ballroom B, 2nd FloorImage result for Alan Anticevic Yale

 

        Alan Anticevic, Yale University

 

Computational Psychiatry: Linking Neuropharmacology, Neuroimaging and Biophysical Modeling to Inform Circuit Mechanisms

 

The functioning and balance of excitatory (E) and inhibitory (I) neural circuit computations plays a pivotal role in supporting all aspects of human thought and behavior. The pattern and timing of alterations in E/I balance across neural circuits has been hypothesized as a parsimonious mechanism that could cut across neuropsychiatric diagnoses such as psychosis spectrum disorders. This presentation outlines method and results in humans that combine the multi-disciplinary approaches of computational modeling, pharmacological manipulations and non-invasive functional neuroimaging to help understand the mechanism underlying altered E/I balance in neuropsychiatric disease. The goal is to provide a roadmap for iteratively closing the gap across levels of analysis, from cells and circuits to neural systems and ultimately altered behavior. Such a roadmap could in turn drive rational development of neurobiological therapies for disrupted neural circuits across the psychiatric spectrum.

to indirectly assess neurochemical functions or even to predict subjects’ prognoses or responses to treatment. The reasonable and efficient use of EEG will be emphasized with a focus on its clinical applications.

 

 

10:30 am - 10:55 am    Coffee Break

 

11:00 am - 12:25 pm    Symposium 1

                Ballroom B, 2nd Floor

 

Use of Clinical Neurophysiology in Clinical Setting: Experience from the Field

Chairs: Lukasz Konopka, David Cantor

 

In research and clinical practice, neurophysiology and quantitative EEG are gaining significant momentum, particularly since the availability of technology and marketing have increased and equipment costs have significantly decreased. In addition, today\'s patients, who are frustrated by therapeutic failures, are seeking new approaches to diagnosis, treatment, and management of behavioral difficulties. Also, with the improvements in data availability, today\'s patients have a greater understanding of brain function and the importance of more directive and data-driven therapies, such as neuro- feedback, transcranial magnetic stimulation, transcranial electrical stimulation, deep brain stimulation, etc. In addition, insurance companies are now more willing to reimburse for neurophysiological evaluations provided by non-MDs. Moreover, as the field advances, we will face problems of translation, which will be directly related to how well we train practitioners in clinical neurophysiology, and particularly, in quantitative EEG. It would be prudent for our researchers and clinicians to join forces and provide systematic, organized training and develop practice standards. In an attempt to facilitate this process, the International Board of Quantitative Electrophysiology (IBQE) was conceived for providing qualified individuals with certification in electrophysiological methods as clinicians and/or researchers. To illustrate the utility of clinical neurophysiology in assessing and treating patients, we will focus on three topics: quantitative EEG in forensic evaluations; clinical neurophysiology in mental health, including psychology; and clinical neurophysiology in psychiatric practice.

 

Presenters: Lukasz Konopka, David Cantor, Tanju Surmeli

    Click here for individual session abstracts

 

11:00 am - 12:25 pm    Symposium 2

                Conference Room A, 3rd Floor

MMN impairment in psychosis: influence of course and outcome

Chair: Armida Mucci

 

Reduced amplitude of mismatch negativity (MMN) to auditory deviant stimuli is a well replicated finding in subjects with schizophrenia (SCZ), reflecting deficits in pre-attentive processing. Recent interest has grown about the characterization of the MMN impairment across a range of clinical presentations, from the high-risk state to the onset of psychosis and, finally, to the chronic phase of the disease. Some results indicated that pervasive MMN deficits are associated with chronic course and poor functional outcome. However, inconsistent findings and lack of adequate control of possible confounds call for further investigation of these associations. The aim of our symposium is to illustrate recent results of different research groups suggesting that MMN might be related to the disease course and be a marker of poor functional outcome. In particular, Derek Fisher will present data showing that a deficit in MMN to phonetic deviants is not present in the first 5 years of illness and appears later on, while Armida Mucci will show that MMN to pitch-(p-MMN) and duration-(d-MMN) deviant tones is impaired across illness stages (from the first 5 to over 30 years), independently of cognitive impairment and severity of psychopathology. Dean Salisbury and Giulia M. Giordano will highlight that results from two independent studies demonstrate that prior to the first contact for psychosis, as well as in the chronic phase, MMN is related to poor functional outcome. These studies suggest that standardization of MMN paradigms and systematic investigation of relationships with outcome will translate MMN research into clinical practice.

 

Presenters: Armida Mucci, Derek Fisher, Guilia Maria Giordano, Dean F Salisbury

 

    Click here for individual session abstracts

 

 

12:30 pm - 2 pm        Lunch Break on your own

 

[1:30 pm - 2 pm        ECNS Membership Meeting]

                Conference Room A, 3rd Floor

 

2 pm - 3:25 pm        Symposium 3

                Ballroom B, 2nd Floor

 

Functional and Structural Abnormalities Associated with

Auditory Verbal Hallucinations in Psychosis

 

Chair: Dean F Salisbury

 

Auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) remain one of the most common and most debilitating symptoms in psychosis. Recent neurophysiological and functional and structural connectivity measures have begun to elucidate the underlying pathology and pathophysiology related to AVH. This session will describe recent advances in understanding the alterations in distributed systems within the brain that contribute to AVH, including possible differential patterns of underlying pathology related to the phenomenology of AVH using EEG measures (Fisher) and basal blood perfusion measures (Stegmayer), patterns of resting functional connectivity (Shinn), and white matter diffusion measures of abnormal structural connectivity (Kubicki, Salisbury). These data begin to reveal distributed circuits related to AVH at the systems-level, and may provide insight into pathophysiology for targeted interventions, including non-invasive brain stimulation.

 

Presenters: Derek Fisher, Ann Shinn, Katharina Stegmayer, Marek Kubicki, Dean F Salisbury

    Click here for individual session abstracts

 

2:00 pm - 3:25        Symposium 4

                Conference Room A, 3rd Floor

 

Gamma oscillations as a biomarker in psychiatric disease

 

Chairs: Nevzat Tarhan, Kemal Arikan

 

Gamma oscillations are the fastest waves in EEG and represent the oscillations faster than 25 Hz. They have been related to several cognitive processes such as attention and memory. From a biological point of view, they arise as a result of interplay between inhibitory and excitatory cortical neurons and alterations in GABA, NMDA and dopamine pathways may effect gamma power. Recent studies indicate that gamma alterations are found in several psychiatric disorders and thus they have the potential to be used as biomarkers. For instance, we have showed that in depressed patients the response to paroxetine is inversely related to the power of gamma oscillations. Again, in a large population of patients with depression, gamma power was significantly greater in suicide attempters as compared to patients only with suicidal ideation. In schizophrenia, we also showed that insight levels are inversely correlated to gamma power. Another study that we will present found that in first episode psychosis patients, auditory evoked 40Hz gamma activity was associated poor metacognition and insight.  In this symposium, we will aim to discuss the biomarker value of gamma oscillations in depression, schizophrenia and suicidality and to propose new research directions.

 

Presenters: Kemal Arikan, Brian O’Donnell, Baris Metin, Tamer Demiralp

    Click here for individual session abstracts

3:30 pm             Coffee Break

 

3:45 pm - 4:25 pm        ECNS Presidential Lecture

        Ballroom B, 2nd FloorImage result for armida mucci sun


 

        Armida Mucci, Second University of Naples
 

       

Are we ready for a neuroscience-informed psychopathology?

 

Psychopathological syndromes demonstrated clinical heterogeneity and affected subjects have different psychopathological manifestations, course and functional outcome. Electrophysiological (EEG) and brain imaging studies produced inconsistent findings for most of the syndromes and demonstrated a large overlap of measures between affected and control subjects at the individual level. These observations suggest that a neurobiological heterogeneity parallels the clinical heterogeneity of mental disorders. According to some findings, the study of psychopathological dimensions is a valuable approach to reduce heterogeneity for the investigation of biomarkers. Furthermore, psychopathological dimensions, unlike diagnostic categories, are predictive of the short- and long-term course and help defining the earliest clinical stages, for early interventions. The investigation of neuroimaging and electrophysiological correlates of dimensions produced testable hypotheses, but discrepancy of findings paralleled uncertainty in the definition and boundaries of each dimension. Attempts to integrate neuroscience and clinical research, as in the Research Domain Criteria, has partially contributed to the dissection and refinement of psychopathological dimensions. As an example of this process, the reconceptualization of some domains of negative symptom as disorders of the reward processing will be illustrated. Brain imaging and electrophysiological data will be presented to highlight the latest achievements in negative symptom research. The integration of longitudinal data in the definition of psychopathological dimensions represents a further challenge for this process of cross-fertilization between clinical and neuroscience research.

 

4:30 pm - 6:00 pm         Society Awards & Awardee Lectures

                Ballroom B, 2nd Floor

 

Honorees TBA

 

6:00pm - 7:00 pm        Poster Session I (click for details)

                Gold Room, 2nd Floor

 

7:30 pm – 10:00 pm            Young Investigator Social Event

                Escape the Room PA

                Pre-registration is required


 

Friday September 7th

 

8:00 am - 8:30 am        Continental breakfast & coffee provided

 

8:30 am - 9:25 pm        Plenary Lecture

        Ballroom B, 2nd Floor

 

   

        Maria Baldwin, University of Pittsburgh



 

Use of EEG in the Cardiac ICU

With the advent of digital EEG, continuous EEG monitoring of ICU patients could more readily be performed. Post cardiac arrest patients have been a particular population of great interest for EEG monitoring. In this session, we will look at the role of EEG in the post cardiac arrest patient. We will explore its use for detection of ictal activity, technical challenges and role in prognosis.

 

9:30 - 10:25            ISNIP Invited Plenary Lecture

                Ballroom B, 2nd Floor

    Mary Phillips, University of Pittsburgh

 

   

Mechanisms of mood disorder in the human brain: multimodal neuroimaging to identify neural targets for new treatments

The overarching goal of my research is to increase understanding of the neural circuitry underlying mood disorders to: 1) identify neural biomarkers to aid diagnosis; 2) identify objective markers of risk for future development of these disorders in youth and young adults; and 3) identify neural targets that may play an important role in the discovery of new and more effective treatments for mood and anxiety disorders. My presentation will focus on the use of multimodal neuroimaging techniques to elucidate functional and structural abnormalities in reward processing and emotional regulation circuitries that are associated with dimensions of reward-related psychopathology in youth and adults. I will focus in particular on recent studies in my laboratory that have used these techniques to elucidate the neural bases of impulsivity and sensation seeking in youth and young adults. I will also present data from our studies in at-risk youth that have identified neurodevelopmental abnormalities in reward and emotional regulation circuitries that are associated with worsening affective pathology and aberrant, impulsive sensation seeking-related behaviors in these youth; and from studies in infants elucidating relationships between large-scale neural circuitry function and emerging emotional behaviors. Finally, I will present findings from ongoing studies in my laboratory that seek to determine the extent to which novel neuromodulation interventions, including transcranial direct current stimulation, targeted on specific neural biomarkers of impulsive sensation seeking in young-mid-life adults can ameliorate abnormalities in reward and emotional regulation neural circuitries and, in turn, reduce propensity for risky decision making and behaviors and future affective pathology.

 

10:30 am - 10:55 am    Coffee Break

 

11:00 am - 11:55 pm    ISFSI Invited Plenary Lecture

        Ballroom B, 2nd Floor


 

        Bin He, Carnegie Mellon University


 

Electrophysiological Source Imaging and

Brain-Computer Interface using EEG

Brain activity is distributed over the 3-dimensional volume and evolves in time. Mapping spatio-temporal distribution of brain activation with high spatial resolution and high temporal resolution is of great importance for understanding the brain and aiding in the clinical diagnosis and management of brain disorders. Electrophysiological source imaging from noninvasively recorded high density electroencephalogram (EEG) has played a significant role in advancing our ability to image brain function and dysfunction. We will discuss current state of EEG-based electrophysiological source imaging in localizing and imaging epileptogenic zone for guiding epilepsy surgery. Our work demonstrated the precision and robustness of high density EEG based source imaging of both the origin and extent of epileptic seizures, as validated by intracranial EEG recordings and surgical resection. We will also discuss the co-localization of hemodynamic and electrophysiological signals associated with motor imagery tasks, and our recent progress in EEG based brain-computer interface, demonstrating that humans can control a robotic arm by “thought”.

 

12:00 pm - 1:45 pm        Lunch Break on your own

 

[1:00 pm - 1:30 pm        ISNIP Board Meeting]

                Conference Room A, 3rd Floor

 

[1:30 pm - 1:55 pm         ISNIP Membership Meeting]

                Conference Room A, 3rd Floor

 

2 pm - 3:25 pm        Pittsburgh City Bus Tour

                Included with registration

                Meet in front of University Club

 

3:30 pm - 4:25 pm        ISNIP Presidential Lecture

        Ballroom B, 2nd Floor


 

        Sebastian Walther, University Clinic Bern

 

Imaging of the motor system in psychosis:

On connectivity and behavior

 

Motor abnormalities are inherent features of psychotic disorders. These motor signs persist throughout the course of the illness and may even present before the onset of the full-blown psychosis. For decades, these symptoms have been exclusively attributed to antipsychotic medication, but historical evidence and studies in medication naïve subjects suggest that motor abnormalities are intrinsic to psychosis. Motor abnormalities could inform on pathobiology and psychosis staging. Instrumental assessments of motor function allow for objective measurements. Renewed interest in the field has stimulated neuroimaging studies on motor abnormalities in psychoses. Indeed, structural and functional alterations in the cerebral motor system are associated with the different abnormal motor behaviors. Particularly, the interaction between cortical motor areas and basal ganglia is of interest in this regard. Catatonia, parkinsonism, dyskinesia and neurological soft signs appear to have distinct associations within the motor network. Cortical motor areas further serve as excellent entry nodes to tackle the motor system by noninvasive brain stimulation. Finally, distinct alterations of motor networks were found in subjects with different risk for psychoses, potentially informing on prodromal pathways. Thus, the motor system in psychosis could become an excellent example of successful integration of neuroimaging techniques into psychiatric practice.

 

4:30 pm - 5:55 pm         Symposium 5

                Ballroom B, 2nd Floor

 

Auditory processing in older adults: Exploring the potential of EEG to quantify age-related auditory neurocognitive decline and to evaluate training outcome

 

                Chairs: Nathalie Giroud, Stefan Elmer

 

Age-related hearing loss (presbycusis) is highly prevalent in old age with about 25% of 70 years old individuals experiencing at least mild presbycusis. Moreover, presbycusis is one of the top three leading causes of disability in older adults, surpassing diabetes and dementia. An age-related decline in auditory functions represents a strong load on speech comprehension and cognitive functions and thereafter on communication, the fundamental principle for social interaction. Nevertheless, the diagnoses and/or quantification of hearing functions (i.e., central hearing loss, speech-in-noise perception, tinnitus, distress during hearing) in older adults is by no means straightforward. On the contrary, up to date there is no standardized procedure available to probe these auditory functions in older adults. Furthermore, age-related changes in the role of cognitive functions such as attention, executive functions, and working memory need to be emphasized when investigating auditory processing across the lifespan. In this symposium we will evaluate the possibility of EEG to quantify auditory functions in older adults, while the role of cognitive factors will be emphasized. Moreover, we will explore the potential of different EEG parameters (ERPs, time-frequency, source localization, functional connectivity) as outcome variables when evaluating rehabilitation strategies to counteract auditory neurocognitive decline in older adults for example by using word learning or lip-reading training. This symposium will therefore make an important contribution to help better understand how hearing functions in older adults may be evaluated in the clinic and how they may be better maintained in the normal aging brain.

 

Presenters: Tess K. Koerner, Lars Rogenmoser, Nathalie Giroud, Stefan Elmer

Click here for individual session abstracts

 

4:30 pm - 5:55 pm         Symposium 6

                Conference Room A, 3rd Floor

 

The Application of EEG in Psychiatry

Chair: Salvatore Campanella

 

This symposium will discuss the usefulness of different electrophysiological tools in psychiatric daily clinical practice. Concerning the detection of schizophrenia, Dean Salisbury (USA) will debate about the potential role of neurophysiological biomarkers such as the MMN, while Nash Boutros (USA) will focus on the utility of resting state vs. evoked EEG/MEG responses. Two talks will be also devoted to addictions. Oliver Pogarell (Germany) will present and discuss data from a neurophysiology-based therapeutic strategy using a real-time neurofeedback paradigm in patients with substance use disorders. Finally, Salvatore Campanella (Belgium) will focus on the impact of anti-craving medication on specific cognitive ERPs biomarkers in recently detoxified alcoholic patients.

 

Presenters: Salvatore Campanella, Oliver Pogarell, Nash Boutros, Dean F Salisbury

Click here for individual session abstracts


 

6:00pm - 7:00 pm        Poster Session II (click for details)

                Gold Room, 2nd Floor


 

Saturday September 8th

 

8:00 am - 8:30 am        Continental breakfast & coffee provided

 

8:30 am - 9:25 pm        Plenary Lecture

        Ballroom A, 1st Floor

 

   

        Nash Boutros, University of Missouri Kansas City


 

The Standard EEG in Childhood Psychiatric Disorders

 

The electroencephalogram (EEG) is an inexpensive non-invasive method for assessing brain function. The EEG remains hugely under-utilized in the assessment of childhood psychiatric disorders. Possible factors contributing to this underutilization will be discussed. The rate of EEG abnormalities is higher in children than in adults with psychiatric problems. That the brain heals itself has been advocated as the explanation for the decrease in the rate of abnormalities with moving from childhood through adolescence to adulthood. In this presentation we will argue that it is the growing thickness of the skull that may be a better explanation of this observation. Abnormalities in childhood psychiatric disorders will be reviewed with a focus on autism spectrum disorder (ASD), attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD) and repeated aggression. The presentation will conclude with providing examples of the ideal design for prospective studies to address the efficacy of treatment based on EEG findings (specifically isolated epileptiform discharges) in children with psychiatric disorders.

 

9:30 - 10:25            ISBET Invited Plenary LectureImage result for werner strik bern

        Ballroom A, 1st Floor


 

        Werner Strik, University Clinic Bern

   

 

Carving Nature by its Joints – The Bern SyNoPsis project

 

Despite important advances in clinical treatment of Schizophrenia, there is a disappointing deadlock regarding long-term disease management, biological heterogeneity, and the variety of theories about its etiology and pathophysiology. A methodological pitfall in contemporary neurobiological research may contribute to the failure to find mechanistic links between mental phenomena and the brain. Consequently, the Bern SyNoPsis project claims that the time-honored phenomenological method to define mental symptoms should not be contaminated with the naturalistic approach of modern neuroscience. Starting point was to shift the essence of psychotic disorders from reality distortion to a fundamental communication breakdown which lead to the development of a novel, neurobiologically informed semiotics of psychotic disorders. The respective operational rating scale (Bern Psychopathology scale, BPS) allows disentangling the clinical manifestations of schizophrenia into behavioral domains matching the functions of three well-described corticobasal brain loops including their corticocortical sensorimotor connections. The results of several empirical studies support the hypothesis that the tripartite symptom structure, segregated into the affective, the language, and the motor domain, can be mapped onto abnormalities of the respective brain systems. Pathophysiological hypotheses derived from this brain systems-oriented approach have contributed to develop and improve novel treatment strategies with noninvasive brain stimulation, clinical parameters and communication strategies. We expect important future advantages for therapeutic alliances, personalized treatment, and de-escalation strategies.

 

10:30 am - 10:55 am    Coffee Break

 

11:00 am - 12:25 pm    Symposium 7

                Ballroom A, 1st Floor

Electrophysiological correlates of cognitive impairment

and negative symptoms in schizophrenia

 

Chairs: Armida Mucci, Nash Boutros

 

Negative symptoms (NS) and cognitive deficits represent core features of schizophrenia with a strong impact on real life functioning. Their pathophysiological mechanisms are poorly understood, preventing the development of advanced treatments. Over the years, research about electrophysiological correlates of NS and cognitive deficits has increased, but only few studies attempted to disentangle ERPs abnormalities associated with NS or neurocognitive domains. Heterogeneity of NS is a major obstacle to research progress. Several studies observed the validity of a categorical approach, subgrouping people with primary and persistent NS, termed as deficit syndrome (DS) and those without them (NDS). Recently, there is a broad consensus on a dimensional approach, as NS load into two factors - avolition/apathy (AA) and expressive deficit (ED). Since NS and cognitive deficits in schizophrenia are partially related, understanding their neurobiological underpinnings could be helpful to identify subgroups of schizophrenia with different prognosis. Nash Boutros will present data on qualitative difference in ERPs abnormalities in subjects with DS and NDS, suggesting that the two subgroups have different pathophysiological mechanisms. Annarita Vignapiano will illustrate the findings of a study in which ERPs analysis during an oddball task revealed a specific pattern of association between N100 abnormalities and ED. Giorgio Di Lorenzo will present a study on the relations between P300 latency and cognitive impairment in the working memory domain in chronic schizophrenia. Brian Coffman will show findings about impairment in the modulation of contralateral delay activity amplitude, a neurophysiological index of visual short-term memory, in subjects at first episode of schizophrenia.

 

Presenters: Armida Mucci, Nash Boutros, Annarita Vignapiano, Giorgio Di Lorenzo, Brian A. Coffman

 

Click here for individual session abstracts

 

11:00 am - 12:25 pm    Symposium 8

                Conference Room A, 3rd Floor

 

Recent advances in white matter imaging in psychiatry

 

Chair: Sebastian Walther

 

Structural connectivity changes are frequently reported in affective and psychotic disorders and white matter microstructure properties have received much attention. The field is still making progress by applying new methods and more fine-grained research objectives. This symposium will demonstrate recent developments in white matter imaging in psychiatry. One talk will cover the longstanding debate on whether antipsychotic medication alters white matter in the short-term. Authors demonstrate the longitudinal effects of six weeks treatment with oral risperidone on white matter properties in previously unmedicated early psychosis patients. Another study will report on the effects of stress, immune factors and genes on white matter in bipolar disorder. The third talk will cover the association of white matter organization, resting state fMRI and cognition in psychosis, reporting distinct associations between structure/function and processing speed as well as working memory. The final talk combines multiple diffusion weighted imaging data sets in schizophrenia with a new meta-analytic method to disentangle effects of age and gender on white matter alterations in patients. Thus, the symposium will provide an excellent overview of the current issues in white matter imaging and the promises of these methods to understand psychiatric disorders.

 

Presenters: Nina Kraguljak, Francesco Benedetti, Peter Kochunov, Marek Kubicki

Click here for individual session abstracts

 

12:30 pm - 2 pm        Lunch Break on your own

 

2 pm - 3:25 pm        Symposium 9

                Ballroom A, 1st Floor

 

Young Investigators Session

 

Chairs: Agnieszka Chrobok, Brian Coffman

 

This session will highlight work of 6 young investigators selected from the submitted abstracts.

 

Presenters: To be determined

    Click here for individual session abstracts

 

2:00 pm - 3:25        Symposium 10

                Conference Room A, 3rd Floor

 

QEEG and Neurofeedback in Psychiatry/Neurology: ADHD, Autistic Spectrum Disorder, Anxiety, Epilepsy, Sleep and Head Injuries/Concussions/Dementia

 

Chair: Michael Linden

 

QEEG has been used in psychology and psychiatry since 1990.  QEEG has its foundation in ADHD Theta/Beta ratios (Lubar, Monastra, Linden) and then identification of subtypes of ADHD.   QEEG based subtypes of Autistic Spectrum Disorder were identified more recently (Linden, Coben). Utilization of QEEG for identification of head injuries began 20 years ago (Duff), and currently is being used to detect Dementia and studied in correlation with CTE (Rozelle). Neurofeedback (EEG Biofeedback) began in the area of seizure disorders and epilepsy (Sterman).  Neurofeedback has been most extensively researched and performed with ADHD (Lubar, Linden). Neurofeedback has recently been studied and used with Autistic Spectrum Disorder (Coben, Linden), anxiety and head injuries (Linden) and TBI related Dementia in retired NFL players (Rozelle).

 

Presenters: Michael Linden, Lucas Kabora, George Rozelle,     John LeMay

    Click here for individual session abstracts

3:30 pm             Coffee Break

3:45 pm - 4:25 pm        ISFSI Presidential Lecture

        Ballroom A, 1st FloorC:\\ecns\\2018 meeting\\Plenary speakers 2018\\GJH3.jpg


 

        Geertjan Husikamp, University Medical Center Utrecht


 

       

Analysis of ripple activity (>80 Hz) in surface EEG of children during sleep

 

The traditional EEG bandwidth of 0-70 Hz has widened with the discovery of high frequency oscillations (HFOs) in intracranial macro-electrodes in epilepsy patients. In these patients so called ripples (80 -250 Hz) and fast ripples (250-500 Hz) have been associated with epileptogenic tissue. Later, these pathological ripples and fast ripples have also been identified in scalp EEG.  In animal models ripples have been described that are associated with normal, physiological function in hippocampus, and later on also in neocortex. These ripples seem to play a role in memory consolidation. In this study we analyze ripples that were found in scalp EEG of children during sleep. EEGs were recorded because of suspicion of epilepsy but often were described as normal. We visually marked ripples following a clinical protocol for analysis of HFOs and for each marking we checked whether there was an ongoing sleep specific transient in the normal EEG band. For the ripple band we performed a time frequency decomposition and defined a corresponding time-dependent spectral entropy in order to characterize the ripple events. We then compared the timing of ripples with respect to co-occuring sleep transients. We found ripples without a co-occuring sleep transient, but also consistent phase relationships of the ripple timings when they did co-occur. This suggest that these ripples are not random events, but are part of a physiological mechanism.

 

4:30 pm - 5:55 pm         Symposium 11

                Ballroom A, 1st Floor

 

Treatment of Auditory Verbal Hallucinations with Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation

            Chairs: Brian A. Coffman, Sebastian Walther

 

Antipsychotics have been the preferred treatment in schizophrenia since the introduction of chlorpromazine in 1952, and these medications have allowed many people to avoid a lifetime of institutionalization. However, in about 25% of cases, auditory hallucinations (one of the most distressing symptoms of schizophrenia) respond only partially to antipsychotic medication, and treatment of cognitive symptoms associated with the disorder (which are most strongly related to global functioning) is modest at best. New noninvasive treatment approaches are therefore being investigated for improving cognition and reducing auditory verbal hallucinations in schizophrenia. In this symposium, speakers will present findings from recent studies of electrical and magnetic brain stimulation for treatment of auditory hallucinations. Dr. Flavio Fröhlich will describe findings from a randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled clinical trial of 10Hz transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) for reducing auditory hallucinations and enhancing auditory steady-state responses in schizophrenia. Stephanie Winkelbeiner will present preliminary findings from a comparison of the effectiveness of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) vs. single- and multi-session transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) protocols for the treatment of auditory hallucinations. Dr. Robert Thoma will present the results of a multimodal study investigating the mechanisms of auditory hallucinations reduction with tDCS. Finally, Dr. Brian Coffman will present preliminary results from a study of single-session tDCS paired with cognitive remediation training for the enhancement of cognitive control and reduction of auditory hallucinations in schizophrenia.

 

Presenters: Flavio Fröhlich, Stephanie Winkelbeiner, Robert J Thoma, Brian A Coffman

Click here for individual session abstracts

 

4:30 pm - 5:55 pm         Symposium 12

                Conference Room A, 3rd Floor

 

Non-ictal paroxysmal EEG discharges (NID):

Reframing to reveal their clinical relevance

 

Chairs: Montserrat Gerez-Malo, Nash Boutros

 

The clinical significance of NID in non-convulsive patients remains controversial. Some authors consider it an epiphenomenon of the underlying condition that should be ignored, while others advocate treatment, based on direct evidence of transient effects on reaction time and cognitive processes, as well as indirect evidence suggesting persistent behavioral and cognitive impairments. Use of antiseizure medications (ASM) in psychiatry has increased exponentially, relying more on empirical than research evidence. The EEG, keystone in epilepsy research and management, is discouraged for psychiatric evaluation. Brief focal discharges cannot explain persistent pleomorphic symptoms.  That perspective shuts down opportunities to understand the mechanisms of well documented relationships between epilepsy and psychiatric disorders. EEG source localization and network analysis offer a wider perspective. This symposium addresses current knowledge and research expectation on NID in clinical settings. Dr. Kaplan presents a multimodal integrative model of periodic discharges in non-convulsive patients, interrelations with metabolic changes and etiologic factors: prognostic and therapeutic implications. The impact of NID in AE response in psychiatry is addressed by Dr. Boutros, based on accumulated evidence from the literature, as well as from his human and animal research.

New technologies to assess network connectivity, presented by Dr. Thatcher, may lead a perspective shift from focal to complex network dysfunction, a more suitable framework to study  NID impact on higher brain function. Dr. Gerez presents results on selected EEG networks as related to neuropsychological scores in normal EEG epochs and the connectivity disruption introduced by NID epochs, related to symptom type and treatment response.

 

Click here for individual session abstracts

 

6:00 pm - 6:15 pm        Close of Scientific Conference & Thanks

                Ballroom A, 1st Floor

 

8:00 pm - 11:00 pm        Conference Banquet

                The Porch

                http://www.dineattheporch.com/schenley

 

Sunday September 9th

 

8:30 am - 9:00 am        Continental breakfast & coffee provided

 

9:00 am - 12:00 pm        Basic EEG in the Psychiatric Clinic Workshop

                Conference Room A, 3rd Floor

                Course Director: Oliver Pogarell

                Pre-registration is required

 

9:00 am - 09:15 am         History and Background – Why EEG in Psychiatry?

 

9:15 am - 09:45 am         Technical background, normal and abnormal EEG patterns,                     clinical significance

 

9:45 am - 10:15 am         EEG in psychiatric emergencies (Delirium, Intoxication,                     Encephalopathies)

 

10:15 am - 10:30 am    BREAK           

 

10:30 am - 11:00 am    Geriatric psychiatry, epileptic and non-epileptic syndromes

 

11:00 am - 11:15 am    Monitoring Pharmacotherapy and ECT

 

11:15 am - 11:45 am    Clinical case presentations with interactive discussions

 

11:45 am - 12:00 pm    Summary, Q&A

 

12:30 pm - 5:30 pm        IBQE qEEG Certification Exam

                Conference Room A, 3rd Floor

 

For more information about IBQE and the certification exam, click here:

http://www.ibqe.info/about.html

 

Pre-registration is required

 

[2:30 pm - 3:00 pm        Coffee Break]